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I Love Typography

MADE POSSIBLE WITH THE SUPPORT OF
I Love Typography
MADE POSSIBLE WITH THE SUPPORT OF

Tag: Incunabula

Unusual fifteenth-century fonts: part 1

Günther Zainer from Reutlingen introduced printing to Augsburg, Germany in 1468. He likely trained in Strasbourg with Johann Mentelin (who later went into business with Jenson and Johannes de Colonia in Venice). Zainer, during his decade-long career (he died in 1478), published some 100 books.

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The first book printed in Italy

During my research for an upcoming book* on the life and work of German Renaissance typographer Erhard Ratdolt, I spent quite some time looking at the introduction of printing to Italy (Ratdolt worked in Venice from 1476 to 1486, thereafter returning to his native Augsburg). The first printers in Italy were, unsurprisingly, from Germany, and […]

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Creating Grand Gargantua

Perhaps nowadays few will know the exact meaning of these two words, but until the middle of the twentieth century a letter was a small piece of lead, and to use it for printing you literally had to move it around, by hand. In the 20th century big machines like the Monotype, equipped with keyboard, were used for typesetting; but until 1900 all type was set by typesetters, by hand. This simple object: a piece of lead with a letter on top, formed the central part of Gutenberg’s invention, back in the middle of the 15th century.

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Incunabula

Marginal Notes A lovely set of photos of books from the Incunabula [1], from the University of Glasgow Library. Note the hand below the marginal notes. Incunabula explained.

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History of typography: Humanist

Incunabula Every subject, from dentistry to dog handling has its own vocabulary — terms that are peculiar (unique) to it. Typography is no exception. Learning the lingua franca (lingo) of type will make typography that much more accessible; and that will, in turn, lead to greater understanding, and hopefully a greater appreciation for all things […]

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TYPE HISTORY MAKING FONTS TYPOGRAPHIC FIRSTS POPULAR