I Love Typography

Type You Like Mobile

Ever see an example of Type You Like? A street sign, a strap-line on a billboard poster, the type on a book cover, or even the typeface on your toothpaste. Well, I’m a little obsessive in my photographing type and lettering, but I’d like to share that obsession; what’s more, I’d like you to get involved.

Every week (or month, depending on the volume of submission), I’ll be featuring Type You Like. Getting involved is simple. Here’s what you need to do:

When you see some type you like—wherever and in whatever form it takes — take a snap of it with your cell-phone (British readers, read “Mobile”) and send it to m@ilovetypography.com
It’s really that simple. If you wish to send some additional info with the photo (i.e. where it was taken, etc), then by all means do so; however, if you’re in a hurry, then just send the photo, no subject, no nothing, just a photo of the type you like.

If you include your Web site address, then your photo (when featured here) will link back to you. So don’t delay, add johno@ilovetypography.com to your phone’s address book, and shoot some type.

Here is one to get the proverbial ball rolling: The cover of “Typography Today”, delivered today (I couldn’t open the packaging fast enough!).

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Smashing typography

The Smashing magazine blog is one of my design favourites. The articles are often great sources of inspiration; sometimes. 80 Beautiful Typefaces for Professional Design.

Let’s take a look at over 80 gorgeous typefaces for professional design, based upon suggestions from designers and web-developers all over the world.

The post — besides the examples (there are actually 85) — is just several paragraphs, but most of the examples are well chosen — there are few I would swap out of their list, though I am disappointed that Georgia is not in there. She would always be in my top ten.

neuzeit.gif

Do you have one that you feel should have made it into the list? Or, would you just like to wax lyrical about your favourites? Let me know. Moreover, if you have an image of typography that works for you, then submit it.

Helmut Schmid at ddd Osaka

The 155th ddd Gallery exhibition adds representative works by Helmut Schmid to the original exhibition, presenting a more comprehensive picture of his design. The exhibition entitled helmut schmid: design is attitude, will run from August 23 to September 26, 2007.

Schmid, now based in Osaka, Japan, studied under Emil Ruder in Basel in the 1960s, and has worked in the design industry for almost half a century.

onschmid01.jpgHelmut Schmid is a precise poetic designer.
In his typographic work, he has been perpetuating Emil Ruder’s legacy from the 1960s into the twenty-first century. Our goal is to shed light on that work and on this person….

In 2003, at the design department at the Fachhochschule Duesseldorf (University of Applied Sciences) in Germany we announced the course “schmid today: typography for advanced studies, design research for beginners.” Since then around 60 students have researched Helmut Schmid’s typographical works. They wrote him postcards regularly; they traveled to Osaka to visit and interview him, his fellow students, and friends. They researched on the Internet, in libraries, in secondhand book stores, among colleagues who were friends or acquaintances.

Fjodor Gejko was there from the beginning. He catalogued Schmid’s oeuvre. The result: two files with a total of around 900 pages. They are the foundation of the digital Schmid archive and the “design is attitude” book and exhibition. After Seoul, Basel, Duesseldorf, and Tokyo, the ddd Gallery invited the exhibition to Osaka.

Philipp Teufel & Victor Malsy.

ddd Exhibition web site.

I’m hoping to visit this exhibition. If I do, I’ll report back. I hope I get to meet him; perhaps I can even get an interview with the man — now that would be a coup!

Notes: Schmid was featured in the Idea Magazine [アイデア] (June, Issue 322)

Helmut Schmid

Helmut Schmid, born 1942 in Austria as a German citizen. Studies in Switzerland at the Basel School of Design under Emil Ruder, Kurt Hauert and Robert Buchler.

Later works in West Berlin and Stockholm (covers for Grafisk Revy). After Montreal (Ernst Roch Design) and Vancouver he works in Osaka for NIA (for Taiho Pharmaceutical and Sanyo). 1973–76 at ARE in Dusseldorf he designs publicity material for the German government and the chancellors Willy Brandt and Helmut Schmidt. 1976 election campaign symbol for the SPD. 1978 exhibition of his politypographien at the Print Gallery in Amsterdam. Independent designer in Osaka since 1981. Member of AGI (Alliance Graphique Internationale) since 1988.

His work includes visual identity programmes for IPSA Cosmetics, the flower boutique Masiyak, confectionery Ruban d’Or, German–Japanese dye-works HMK, and the German trades union IGBE. Product identities for Pocari Sweat, Fibe-Mini and Java Tea drinks for Otsuka; the Savon d’Or and HG series for Shiseido Fine Toiletry; and the logotypes Elixir, uv white and Evenese for Shiseido Cosmetics. An important design work is the bi-lingual packaging identity for medical products like Meptin, Mikelan, Acuatim for Otsuka Pharmaceutical.

typtoday.jpg

His syllabary face Katakana Eru, created during the years 1967 to 1970 with the purpose of achieving a harmonious relationship with the Latin alphabet, is today a trademark of his work. He is editor and designer of typography today (Seibundo Shinkosha, Tokyo 1980) and of a special issue of the Swiss TM (1973) on Japanese typography. 1983 lecture in Xian, China (typography, seen and read). His book design work includes the japan typography annual 1985, Takeo Desk Diary, and Hats for Jizo (Robundo, Tokyo 1988) with illustrations by nine-year old Nicole. He celebrated the fall of the Berlin wall with the publication 1989 11 09, typographic reflections 1. In preparation is Japan japanese, the book containing his series of articles which appeared in the Swiss Typographische Monatsblatter (1968–79).

Welcome to I Love Typography

I collect samples of ‘type’ wherever I go, usually recording it with a photograph. The simple aim of this blog is to record and share those findings, and to get your typographic juices flowing.

I intend to broaden this site’s scope in time; ideally, I’d love to make it all things type, with numerous resources, biographies of typographers, a glossary of typography terms, and … lots of other very useful, entertaining and, well, interesting stuff.

If things on this page look a little awry, then that’s because I’m still building the site. Should be ready for general consumption by the end of August 2007.

In the meantime, if you have any comments or suggestions, then let me know. Would be great to hear from you.

40.jpg

Can you name this typeface? The one used to set “40”. Hint: it’s a Japanese road sign.


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